1. What We Ask of You

    Understand that we do not ask you to hear our voices because we are grieving. We ask you to hear our voices because we are exhausted from grieving. Biologicals cannot fathom the experiences of adoptees – the depth of our losses, the ways these losses permeate every part of our being, every experience, every decision. Even we do not always comprehend how ingrained these losses are within us, but …Read More

  2. Tips for Parenting Trauma-Reactive Kids

    While I could write for days on the topic of trauma in adoption and foster care kiddos, I’m writing this blog with the assumption that many parents already understand quite a bit about the basics of it. After all, adoptive parents receive a lot of training about “trauma.” You learn about brain development, definitions of trauma, how it impacts your kiddo and how to be aware of signs that sug…Read More

  3. Why Abuse Can Create Learned Helplessness

    Many of us have wondered: If a person is being abused, why don’t they tell someone about it and get help? Or if it’s an adult who is being hurt, why don’t they leave the relationship? It sounds like common sense, but the truth is, leaving an abusive relationship can be extremely difficult for both children and adults. This is because abuse is not about harm – it is about power. Regardless …Read More

  4. Helping Your Child Cope with a Difficult Divorce

    Unfortunately, most divorces are not exactly amicable. Affairs, abandonment, substance abuse, incarceration or hostile arguments may characterize the road to your divorce. In those cases, how to you talk to your kids about it in a healthy way? Make sure your needs are met. Be sure that you are staying as healthy and emotionally stable as possible during this stressful time. Eat right, exercise, fi…Read More

  5. Talking with Kids of All Ages about Tragedy

    As a parent, how do you explain an event as tragic as the Connecticut school shooting to a child, when you can hardly make sense of it yourself? All of the experts say to talk to your child in an “age-appropriate” way, but what does that really mean? The most important part of discussing tragedy with your kids is to be genuine – allow your children to see your emotions, whether they include …Read More