1. What We Ask of You

    Understand that we do not ask you to hear our voices because we are grieving. We ask you to hear our voices because we are exhausted from grieving. Biologicals cannot fathom the experiences of adoptees – the depth of our losses, the ways these losses permeate every part of our being, every experience, every decision. Even we do not always comprehend how ingrained these losses are within us, but …Read More

  2. Helping Your Child Cope with an Amicable Divorce

    As a parent, how do you tell your child that his or her parents are no longer going to be together? Even if the divorce is a mutual or amicable decision made by you and your partner, it can feel difficult to share this news with your child. Here are 5 guidelines for telling your child about a mutual divorce decision and helping him or her to cope with the changes: Present a united front. Plan out …Read More

  3. Helping Your High Schooler Cope with Loss

    Though a teenager’s understanding of death and grief may be similar to that of an adult, it is important to remember that they are not yet adults. The teen years are often characterized by an internal battle between dependence and independence when it comes to parent-child relationships, and coping with the loss of a loved one is no different. Your teen may be struggling to cope independently in…Read More

  4. Helping Your Middle Schooler Cope with Loss

    Children who are nearing adolescence will have a greater understanding of the concepts associated with death, such as the irreversibility of death and the potential causes. They will also begin to formulate thoughts about how the loss of a loved one will impact their future. The “What if’s” become more apparent at this age. Developmental Understanding Children in the 10- to 12-year-old range…Read More

  5. Helping Your Elementary-Age Child Cope with Loss

    Children ages six to ten will exhibit greater curiosity about death than during previous developmental stages. Some of their questions and words may seem frightening to you as a parent, because they lack the tact of an adult who understands the emotional intricacies associated with loss of a loved one. Developmental Understanding By this age, children typically understand that death is permanent, …Read More

  6. Helping Your Preschooler Cope with Loss

    Preschoolers’ understanding of death is in a tricky developmental stage. With infants and toddlers, physical affection and consistency are key; while this is also true with preschoolers, the verbal aspect of communication is now in play, as well. Developmental Understanding Children of this age equate death with sleeping or going on a trip. Death is not viewed as permanent, because they do not y…Read More

  7. Helping Your Infant or Toddler Cope with Loss

    No matter how young someone is, they will grieve the loss of someone close. Even your infant or toddler will experience a sense of loss when a person who has been around them frequently is suddenly gone. It can feel challenging to try to comfort a baby who is grieving when they cannot understand the concept of death. As adults, we often depend upon language to explain, clarify and heal during time…Read More