1. A Lesson in Self-Care from Our Children

    As we move into mid-summer and kids are home throughout the day, you might notice that your stress level rises, but your child's stress level seems to remain pretty stable. What do kids know that we don't when it comes to de-stressing? As adults, we worry about paying bills, our children, our pets, aging parents, work, losing weight, cleaning the house – and the list goes on. And yet, do you rec…Read More

  2. Tips for Parenting Trauma-Reactive Kids

    While I could write for days on the topic of trauma in adoption and foster care kiddos, I’m writing this blog with the assumption that many parents already understand quite a bit about the basics of it. After all, adoptive parents receive a lot of training about “trauma.” You learn about brain development, definitions of trauma, how it impacts your kiddo and how to be aware of signs that sug…Read More

  3. The “Rad Ric” Contest for kids is officially underway!!!!

    Rad Ric is an acronym to help you and your transracially adopted kids remember the most effective ways to respond to racism: R - Redirecting and channeling your anger into something positive and productive A - Avoiding confrontations that involve hurtful words or actions D - Defusing situations by staying calm and using gentle words R - Reporting the problem to a trusted adult if it continues or…Read More

  4. Responding to Insensitive Adoption Questions

    The adoption experience may lead you to feel like you and your family members are part of an exclusive “club” – one which many people find mysterious and fascinating, and are curious to learn more about. While others’ intentions are typically not malicious, their questions may sound insensitive to the ears of someone who IS in the “club.” Because so many of the people who ask questions…Read More

  5. Feeling Part of Extended Family

    Everyone on my mom’s side of the family has the same nose – the “Foster” nose. I always noticed this as a child, how similar they looked. Mostly, I think I noticed this because I did not look like them. I am Indian, they are of Polish descent. I was always very thankful to have my brother around – even though we are not biologically related, he was also adopted from India, so we looked s…Read More

  6. Talking About Birth Parents and Identity

    Talking with your child about his or her birth parents can be a delicate topic. You may know a lot about your child’s history, or nothing at all. You may feel grateful towards your child’s birth parents, or angry at them for putting your child through a difficult early life. You may experience feelings of insecurity when your child wants to learn more about them, or you may feel comfortable wi…Read More

  7. Talking to Your Child about Adoption

    As an adoptive parent, it may seem intimidating to talk to your child about being adopted. The good news is, your child ISN’T intimidated by this talk, and you don’t have to be either! When it comes to talking about adoption, it shouldn’t be “the conversation” – it should be an open and ongoing process throughout your child’s lifetime. Begin talking about adoption from the moment you…Read More